Taiwan’s Inclusion in the WHO: A Global Imperative

The content originally appeared on: ZIZ Broadcasting Corporation

As the world grapples with the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and braces for future public health threats, the necessity for a comprehensive, inclusive approach to global health governance has never been clearer. Central to this approach is the unequivocal inclusion of Taiwan in the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Health Assembly (WHA). Excluding Taiwan not only undermines the integrity of global health initiatives but also poses a significant risk to international health security.

Taiwan’s Track Record of Public Health Excellence

Taiwan’s public health achievements are impressive by any measure. Taiwan has demonstrated exemplary performance in managing public health crises, including SARS in 2003 and COVID-19 more recently. Taiwan’s proactive measures, such as early border controls, widespread testing, rigorous contact tracing, and transparent communication, have resulted in one of the lowest per capita COVID-19 infection and mortality rates in the world. This success is not incidental but the outcome of a robust healthcare system and effective government policies.

Taiwan’s health expertise is a valuable asset that the world cannot afford to ignore. Its inclusion in the WHO and WHA would bring a wealth of experience and innovative practices that could significantly bolster global health preparedness and response capabilities.

The Need for Inclusivity in the New Pandemic Agreement

As the world debates the formulation of a new pandemic agreement, inclusivity should be a cornerstone principle. This agreement must reflect the interconnected nature of our global society and ensure that all capable entities, regardless of political considerations, are included. Taiwan’s exclusion is a politically motivated decision that disregards its substantial contributions and capabilities in global health.

The argument for Taiwan’s inclusion transcends politics; it is a matter of global public health. The WHO’s mission is to promote health, keep the world safe, and serve the vulnerable. Achieving these goals necessitates the involvement of all regions and populations, including Taiwan. The new pandemic agreement must be comprehensive and forward-thinking, incorporating lessons learned from past outbreaks and ensuring that no capable health entity is sidelined.

A Call to Action

Taiwan’s inclusion in the WHO is not just a plea for fairness but a strategic imperative for enhancing global health security. Excluding Taiwan is not only unjust but also imprudent. In an era where global health challenges are increasingly complex and intertwined, we need all hands on deck. Taiwan’s integration into the WHO and WHA will strengthen the global health architecture, making it more resilient and responsive.

In conclusion, the next global pandemic is not a question of if, but when. To prepare effectively, we must embrace inclusivity and cooperation. Once again, Taiwan urges its international friends and partners to continue to support its participation in the WHO to enable Taiwan to contribute more for the global health community. Our global health depends on it.

Michael Lin

Ambassador of the Republic of China (Taiwan) to the Federation of St. Kitts and Nevis